Rendering 3D Text with Core Text and libtess2

In this article, we’ll discuss how to create and render 3D text with Metal. Most applications need to render text, and there are many techniques for drawing 2D text with graphics APIs, from pre-rasterized font atlases, to signed-distance field methods like Chris Green’s seminal work at Valve or GLyphy, to cutting-edge vector-based solutions like Slug. Most of these techniques generalize to positioning 2D text in 3D environments as well. Some even allow text to conform to the contours of 3D objects.

The technique discussed here is not intended for general use in graphical user interfaces (GUIs), where you often see 2D text. Rather, this article is about how to create an extruded 3D mesh that represents a string of text. This kind of mesh has many uses, such as labeling objects in virtual/augmented reality or educational applications. Any time you need a piece of text to have some heft to it, you might consider using extruded text.

An example of the 3D text you can create with the technique described in this article.

You can download the sample code for this article here.

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Rendering Text in Metal with Signed-Distance Fields

In this article, we will discuss a method for rendering high-fidelity text with Metal. It’s easy to overlook text rendering when thinking about 3D graphics. However, very few games or applications can get by without displaying any text, so it’s important to consider how we can best use the GPU to incorporate text into our Metal apps.

Text rendered by the sample app
Text rendered by the sample app, using the signed-distance field technique

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